Jaime McClintock

Sound Wave 

Year: 2019 

Material: Watercolor on paper 

Size: 22in x 30in 

 

Crescendo 

Year: 2020 

Material: Video 

 

Ambrosia 

Year: 2020 

Material: Video 

 

Weaving Thought 

Year: 2020 

Material: Watercolor and

oil pastels on paper 

Size: 11in x 15in 

Panic 

Year: 2020 

Material: Gouache and

acrylic paint on yupo paper 

Size: 26in x 40in 

 

Like the Universe is Exploding 

Year: 2020 

Material: Video 

 

Neighborhood 

Year: 2019 

Material: Oil pastel on paper 

Size: 26in x 40in 

 

 Transformation of a Line 

Year: 2019 

Material: Video 

 

Painterly 

Year: 2020 

Material: Video 

 

Living On 

Year: 2020 

Material: Oil pastel on Paper 

Size: 9in x 12in

Throughout this academic year, I have been creating art using paint and video. Art is often used to express a message; within my own work, I have expressed veiled emotions through creating. I struggle to show honest emotions intentionally in my artwork. However, over time I have realized when you build artwork, you’re showing a part of yourself to the viewer. The artist must reveal some amount of truth of the artist for the work to be interesting. 

 

I started my work by creating patterns. Generating rules for myself, I dictated how I would respond to my own paintings without before they existed. I built upon my work, creating fields of repetition and abstract landscapes. I started by using watercolor and gouache but over time I moved away from the strict arrangement of paint. The material of paint became a cage I created by my need for control. Forcing myself under strict regulations, I was keeping excitement and spontaneity from tainting the work. In doing so, I stopped my practice from flourishing. My practice needed to loosen up before I could generate stronger piece. I allowed my hand to move more freely with drawing. I employed colored pencil and oil pastels. 

 

As I worked in stagnant 2D, I worked to continually transform my paintings using video. Forcing a camera’s perspective onto the painting, I could control how a viewer interacted with my piece. The act of video over painting satisfied my need for control while allowing impulsiveness to further the work as I made it. The recorded footage was further abstracted by putting them through programs that warped and redistributed the visual images. Those videos are then edited to create a new digital painting. Video is a unique material as it lives in memory. Because the viewer can only look at the piece as long as it plays, you’re memory dictates what you take away from the piece. This allowed me to invent thriving biomes that the mind can experience in an instant or exist in through recollection. 

 

Both mediums rely on the concept of time for the viewer to interpret the piece. While still at school, a large portion of my painting practice had to do with the length of time I could put into a piece. The labor of creating systematic paintings, planning how the pieces would fit together was important. Those pieces were restricted. They were expressing an anxiety to let loose. The painting remained flat and lacked attraction. The work became stronger when it was transferred to video. I allowed myself to breath, to adapt to the work and pulled away from excessive planning. 

 

Since the quarantine started, that process has been accelerated. Without the setting of the studio, though it is more difficult to work, it is easier to express those veiled emotions then it was previously. There is no time to dawdle and plan, no extra space in my head to try and compose work. Therefore if I want to create work, I must just go about making. This collection is a display of those lessons.