Mackenzie Slater

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The Artist  

Archival inkjet print 

20”x16” 

 

Reflected Light 

Archival inkjet print 

8”x5.5” 

 

Observation of My Shadow 

Archival inkjet print 

6”x10” 

 

The Camera is a Tool 

Archival inkjet print 

10”x6.5” 

 

Impressed 

Archival inkjet print 

6”x4.5” 

 

Doubled Gesture 

Archival inkjet print 

18”x14.5” 

 

Suspended Movement 

Archival inkjet print 

6.5”x10” 

 

The Way the Wind Blows 

Archival inkjet print 

15”x10” 

 

Memorizing My Body 

Archival inkjet print 

20”x16” 

 

Resolution 

Archival inkjet print 

22”x18” 

The photographic work for When the Moment Has Passed (2020) is primarily made with 35mm and 4x5 inch film. Photographs presented in this body of work are in color and black and white in a varying range of printed sizes, between 8x10” and 18x20”. Typically the prints are made larger to distort the quality of the photograph and the subject contained within it. The subjects presented in the work are self-portraits, light, still life in nature, and the objects around me. Reflections through glass and mirrors, as well as varying physical elements of film, such as light leaks and dust are also present within the photographs to connote the use and process of film itself, which is an important aspect of the work. The photographs are made with a process oriented philosophy and with the idea that I am an observer of the world around me, using the camera as a tool to contain memories and document my life. The photos also conceptually address the idea of woman as photographer in the self-portraits where my gaze is direct and shows authority over my body and the rest of my photographs in the series. 

 

Formally, the photographs are well composed and framed, with a concentration on lighting and color or tonal range. By creating these photos, I want the audience to be able to appreciate light and form or the gaze of the subject as I do when I create them, and I would like my audience to feel like they’re caught in a dream or memory when they approach my photographs. The obsessive need to document and contain the world around me and my own physicality is what drives my work. The ability to stop time in a single frame is powerful, and to elongate the time between creating the photograph and seeing it scanned and printed is a deliberate action I take when using film to hold that power. 

 

Artists like Wolfgang Tillmans, Sam Contis, Ansel Adams, Stephen Shore, and William Eggleston continue to inspire my practice in terms of what I am creating, what tools I am using, and how I see the world. Reading about up and coming artists, viewing and discussing my peers’ work, studying cinema, and writing about my work also benefit my process when I create new pictures. My most important reminder to myself is to just make a picture, even if I’m unsure about it fitting in with the rest of my photographs.